The bivalency effect represents an interference-triggered adjustment of cognitive control: an ERP study

Rey-Mermet, Alodie; Koenig, Thomas; Meier, Beat (2013). The bivalency effect represents an interference-triggered adjustment of cognitive control: an ERP study. Cognitive, affective & behavioral neuroscience, 13(3), pp. 575-583. Psychonomic Society 10.3758/s13415-013-0160-z

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When bivalent stimuli (i.e., stimuli with relevant features for two different tasks) occur occasionally among univalent stimuli, performance is slowed on subsequent univalent stimuli even if they have no overlapping stimulus features. This finding has been labeled the bivalency effect. It indexes an adjustment of cognitive control, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood yet. The purpose of the present study was to shed light on this question, using event-related potentials. We used a paradigm requiring predictable alternations between three tasks, with bivalent stimuli occasionally occurring on one task. The results revealed that the bivalency effect elicited a sustained parietal positivity and a frontal negativity, a neural signature that is typical for control processes implemented to resolve interference. We suggest that the bivalency effect reflects interference, which may be caused by episodic context binding.

Item Type: Journal Article (Original Article)
Division/Institute: 04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Experimental Psychology and Neuropsychology
10 Strategic Research Centers > Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory (CCLM)
UniBE Contributor: Rey-Mermet, Alodie; König, Thomas and Meier, Beat
Subjects: 100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
ISSN: 1530-7026
Publisher: Psychonomic Society
Language: English
Submitter: Thomas König
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2014 09:00
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2014 14:08
Publisher DOI: 10.3758/s13415-013-0160-z
PubMed ID: 23584989
URI: http://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/39758

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