An orienting response is not enough: Bivalency not infrequency causes the bivalency effect

Rey-Mermet, Alodie; Meier, Beat (2013). An orienting response is not enough: Bivalency not infrequency causes the bivalency effect. Advances in cognitive psychology, 9(3), pp. 146-155. Faculty of Psychology, University of Finance and Management 10.5709/acp-0142-9

[img]
Preview
Text
Rey-MermetMeier_AdCP2013.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (571kB) | Preview

When switching tasks, occasionally responding to bivalent stimuli (i.e., stimuli with relevant features for two different tasks) slows performance on subsequent univalent stimuli, even when they do not share relevant features with bivalent stimuli. This performance slowing is labelled the bivalency effect here, we investigated whether the bivalency effect results from an orienting response to the infrequent stimuli (i.e., the bivalent stimuli). To this end, we compared the impact of responding to infrequent univalent stimuli to the impact of responding to infrequent bivalent stimuli. For the latter, the results showed a performance slowing for all trials following bivalent stimuli. This indicates a long-lasting bivalency effect, replicating previous findings. For infrequent univalent stimuli, however, the results showed a smaller and shorter-lived performance slowing. These results demonstrate that the bivalency effect does not simply reflect an orienting response to infrequent stimuli. Rather it results from the conflict induced by bivalent stimuli, probably by episodic binding with the more demanding context created by them.

Item Type: Journal Article (Original Article)
Division/Institute: 07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Experimental Psychology and Neuropsychology
10 Strategic Research Centers > Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory (CCLM)
UniBE Contributor: Rey-Mermet, Alodie and Meier, Beat
Subjects: 100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
ISSN: 1895-1171
Publisher: Faculty of Psychology, University of Finance and Management
Language: English
Submitter: Anna Maria Ruprecht
Date Deposited: 30 Oct 2014 09:59
Last Modified: 27 Jul 2015 10:54
Publisher DOI: 10.5709/acp-0142-9
Uncontrolled Keywords: bivalent stimuli, task switching, cognitive control, episodic context binding
BORIS DOI: 10.7892/boris.59497
URI: http://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/59497

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback