Rational Tool Use and Tool Choice in Human Infants and Great Apes

Buttelmann, David; Carpenter, Malinda; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael (2008). Rational Tool Use and Tool Choice in Human Infants and Great Apes. Child development, 79(3), pp. 609-626. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2008.01146.x

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G. Gergely, H. Bekkering, and I. Király (2002) showed that 14-month-old infants imitate rationally, copying an adult’s unusual action more often when it was freely chosen than when it was forced by some constraint. This suggests that infants understand others’ intentions as rational choices of action plans. It is important to test whether apes also understand others’ intentions in this way. In each of the current 3 studies, a comparison group of 14-month-olds used a tool more often when a demonstrator freely chose to use it than when she had to use it, but apes generally used the tool equally often in both conditions (orangutans were an exception). Only some apes thus show an understanding of others’ intentions as rational choices of action plans.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Developmental Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Buttelmann, David

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0009-3920

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

David Buttelmann

Date Deposited:

18 Jun 2018 15:40

Last Modified:

18 Jun 2018 15:40

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1467-8624.2008.01146.x

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.101111

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/101111

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