Selective Imitation of In-Group Over Out-Group Members in 14-Month-Old Infants

Buttelmann, David; Zmyj, Norbert; Daum, Moritz; Carpenter, Malinda (2012). Selective Imitation of In-Group Over Out-Group Members in 14-Month-Old Infants. Child development, 84(2), pp. 422-428. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2012.01860.x

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Recent research has shown that infants are more likely to engage with in‐group over out‐group members. However, it is not known whether infants' learning is influenced by a model's group membership. This study investigated whether 14‐month‐olds (N = 66) selectively imitate and adopt the preferences of in‐group versus out‐group members. Infants watched an adult tell a story either in their native language (in‐group) or a foreign language (out‐group). The adult then demonstrated a novel action (imitation task) and chose 1 of 2 objects (preference task). Infants did not show selectivity in the preference task, but they imitated the in‐group model more faithfully than the out‐group model. This suggests that cultural learning is beginning to be truly cultural by 14 months of age.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Developmental Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Buttelmann, David

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0009-3920

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

David Buttelmann

Date Deposited:

18 Jun 2018 14:09

Last Modified:

18 Jun 2018 14:09

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1467-8624.2012.01860.x

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.101119

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/101119

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