Relation between travel strategy and social organization of migrating birds with special consideration of formation flight in the northern bald ibis.

Voelkl, Bernhard; Frtiz, Johannes (2017). Relation between travel strategy and social organization of migrating birds with special consideration of formation flight in the northern bald ibis. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society. Series B - biological sciences, 372(1727) Royal Society of London 10.1098/rstb.2016.0235

[img] Text
2017-Voelkl et al..pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy

A considerable proportion of the world’s bird species undertake seasonal longdistance migrations. These journeys are energetically demanding. Two Major behavioural means to reduce energy expenditure have been suggested: the use of thermal uplifts for a soaring-glidingmigration style and travelling in echelon or V-shaped formation. Both strategies have immediate consequences for the social organization of the birds as they either cause large aggregations or require travelling in small and stable groups. Here, we first discuss those consequences, and second present an analysis of formation flight in a flock of
northern bald ibis on their first southbound migration. We observe clear correlations between leading and trailing on the dyadic level but only a weak
correlation on the individual level during independent flight and no convincing
correlation during the human guided part of the migration. This pattern
is suggestive of direct reciprocation as a means for establishing cooperation
during formation flight. In general, we conclude that behavioural adaptations
for dealing with physiological constraints on long-distance migrations either
necessitate or ultimately foster formation of social groups with different characteristics.
Patterns and social organization of birds travelling in groups have been
elusive to study; however, new tracking technology—foremost lightweight
GPS units—will provide more insights in the near future.
This article is part of the themed issue ‘Physiological determinants of
social behaviour in animals’.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute > Animal Welfare Division
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Völkl, Bernhard

ISSN:

0962-8436

Publisher:

Royal Society of London

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeremy Davidson Bailoo

Date Deposited:

11 Oct 2017 15:59

Last Modified:

16 Jan 2020 08:53

Publisher DOI:

10.1098/rstb.2016.0235

PubMed ID:

28673913

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.101720

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/101720

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback