Uptake and Transport of Radioactive Cesium and Strontium into Strawberry Plants and Grapevines After Leaf Contamination

Zehnder, Hans-Jürg; Kopp, Peter; Eikenberg, Jost; Feller, Urs; Oertli, Jakob J. (1996). Uptake and Transport of Radioactive Cesium and Strontium into Strawberry Plants and Grapevines After Leaf Contamination. In: Gerzabek, M.; Desmet, G.; Howard, B.J.; Heinrich, G.; Schimmack, W. (eds.) Ten Years Radioecological Research Following the Chernobyl Accident. Mitteilungen der Oesterreichischen Bodenkundlichen Gesellschaft: Vol. 53 (pp. 155-161). Wien: Osterreichische Bodenkundliche Gesellschaft

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Radioactive strontium in the form of a carrier-free aqueous solution of 85SrCl2 was taken up by the leaves of strawberry plants and grapevines at different rates. Only a limited amount was transported from the contaminated leaves into other plant organs. However, no strontium was found in the fruit. These findings show that bivalent strontium is mobile in plants only to a very minor extent. In contrast, radioactive cesium applied as an aqueous solution of carrier-free 134CsCl was taken up very quickly from the leaf surface, transported from there to other plant parts and released to some extent into the soil via the roots. In our investigations, strawberry fruit showed a high cesium content. The cesium content in grape berries rose during growth and decreased again in a late phase of maturation and the nuclide was partly redistributed to other plant parts. Cesium reaching the soil may interact with clay particles resulting in a very limited availability for plants. First results of investigations with · grapevines in hydroculture demonstrated a close relationship between potassium supply and cesium release. The foliar uptake of radioactive strontium into plants is minor and represents therefore a negligible risk for the consumer of fruits, berries and nuts. Radioactive cesium nuclides may however reach the hum.an food chain through the leaves of food plants.

Item Type:

Book Section (Book Chapter)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Plant nutrition (discontinued)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Feller, Urs

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0029-893X

Series:

Mitteilungen der Oesterreichischen Bodenkundlichen Gesellschaft

Publisher:

Osterreichische Bodenkundliche Gesellschaft

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

31 Jan 2018 15:44

Last Modified:

31 Jan 2018 15:44

Additional Information:

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Radioecology

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.102070

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/102070

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