Engagement in pleasant leisure activities and blood pressure: A 5-year longitudinal study in Alzheimer's caregivers.

Mausbach, Brent T; Romero-Moreno, Rosa; Bos, Taylor; von Känel, Roland; Ziegler, Michael G; Allison, Matthew A; Mills, Paul J; Dimsdale, Joel E; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Losada, Andrés; Márquez-González, María; Patterson, Thomas L; Grant, Igor (2017). Engagement in pleasant leisure activities and blood pressure: A 5-year longitudinal study in Alzheimer's caregivers. Psychosomatic medicine, 79(7), pp. 735-741. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000497

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OBJECTIVE Elevated blood pressure is a significant public health concern, particularly given its association with cardiovascular disease risk, including stroke. Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease has been associated with physical health morbidity, including higher blood pressure. Engagement in adaptive coping strategies may help prevent blood pressure elevation in this population. This 5-year longitudinal study examined whether greater participation in pleasant leisure activities was associated with reduced blood pressure in caregivers. METHODS Participants were 126 in-home spousal Alzheimer caregivers (mean age = 74.2 ± 7.9 years) that completed five yearly assessments. Linear mixed effects models analysis was used to examine the longitudinal relationship between pleasant leisure activities and caregivers' blood pressure, after adjusting for demographic and health characteristics. RESULTS Greater engagement in pleasant leisure activities was associated with reduced mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; B = -0.08, SE = 0.04, p = 0.040). Follow-up analyses indicated engagement in activities was significantly associated with reduced diastolic (B = -0.07, SE = 0.03, p = 0.030) but not systolic blood pressure (B = -0.10, SE = 0.06, p = 0.114). In addition, MAP was significantly reduced when caregiving duties ended because of placement of care recipients in nursing homes (B = -3.10, SE = 1.11, p = 0.005) or death of the care-recipient (B = -2.64, SE = 1.14, p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS Greater engagement in pleasant leisure activities was associated with lowered caregivers' blood pressure over time. Participation in pleasant leisure activities may have cardiovascular health benefits for Alzheimer's caregivers.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DCR Unit Sahli Building > Forschungsgruppe Neurologie

UniBE Contributor:

von Känel, Roland

ISSN:

0033-3174

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Stefanie Hetzenecker

Date Deposited:

02 Nov 2017 16:05

Last Modified:

02 Nov 2017 16:13

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/PSY.0000000000000497

PubMed ID:

28640179

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.102121

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/102121

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