Body mass index in midlife and dementia: Systematic review and meta-regression analysis of 589,649 men and women followed in longitudinal studies

Albanese, Emiliano; Launer, Lenore J.; Egger, Matthias; Prince, Martin J.; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Wolters, Frank J.; Egan, Kieren (2017). Body mass index in midlife and dementia: Systematic review and meta-regression analysis of 589,649 men and women followed in longitudinal studies. Alzheimer's & dementia, 8, pp. 165-178. Elsevier 10.1016/j.dadm.2017.05.007

[img]
Preview
Text
Albanese AlzheimersDement(Amst) 2017.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works (CC-BY-NC-ND).

Download (931kB) | Preview

Introduction We conducted a meta-analysis of the conflicting epidemiologic evidence on the association between midlife body mass index (BMI) and dementia. Methods We searched standard databases to identify prospective, population-based studies of dementia risk by midlife underweight, overweight, and obesity. We performed random-effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions of adjusted relative risk (RR) estimates and formally explored between-study heterogeneity. Results We included 19 studies on 589,649 participants (2040 incident dementia cases) followed up for up to 42 years. Midlife (age 35 to 65 years) obesity (BMI ≥ 30) (RR, 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08–1.63), but not overweight (25 < BMI < 30) (RR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.96–1.20), was associated with dementia in late life. The association with midlife underweight (RR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.13–1.70) was potentially driven by residual confounding (P from meta-regression = .004), selection (P = .046), and information bias (P = .007). Discussion Obesity in midlife increases the risk of dementia. The association between underweight and dementia remains controversial.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Egger, Matthias

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

1552-5279

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Beatrice Minder Wyssmann

Date Deposited:

05 Sep 2017 10:25

Last Modified:

31 Jan 2019 11:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.dadm.2017.05.007

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Dementia; Body mass index; BMI; Obesity; Meta-analysis

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.102396

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/102396

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback