Altered praxis network underlying limb kinetic apraxia in Parkinson's disease - an fMRI study.

Kübel, Stefanie; Stegmayer, Katharina; Vanbellingen, Tim; Pastore-Wapp, Manuela; Bertschi, Manuel; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Abela, Eugenio; Weder, Bruno; Walther, Sebastian; Bohlhalter, Stephan (2017). Altered praxis network underlying limb kinetic apraxia in Parkinson's disease - an fMRI study. NeuroImage: Clinical, 16, pp. 88-97. Elsevier 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.07.007

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Parkinson's disease (PD) patients frequently suffer from dexterous deficits impeding activities of daily living. There is controversy whether impaired fine motor skill may stem from limb kinetic apraxia (LKA) rather than bradykinesia. Based on classical models of limb praxis LKA is thought to result when premotor transmission of time-space information of skilled movements to primary motor representations is interrupted. Therefore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we tested the hypothesis that dexterous deficits in PD are associated with altered activity and connectivity in left parieto-premotor praxis network. Whole-brain analysis of fMRI activity during a task for LKA (coin rotation) showed increased activation of superior and inferior parietal lobule (SPL, IPL) and ventral premotor cortex (vPM) in PD patients compared to controls. For bradykinesia (assessed by finger tapping) a decreased fMRI activity could be detected in patients. Additionally, psychophysical interaction analysis showed increased functional connectivity between IPL and the posterior hippocampi in patients with PD. By contrast, functional connectivity to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was decreased in patients with PD compared to controls. In conclusion, our data demonstrates that dexterous deficits in PD were associated with enhanced fMRI activation of the left praxis network upstream to primary motor areas, mirroring a neural correlate for the behavioral dissociation of LKA and bradykinesia. Furthermore, the findings suggest that patients recruit temporal areas of motor memory as an attempt to compensate for impaired motor skills. Finally, dysexecutive function may contribute to the deficit.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Gerontechnology and Rehabilitation
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology

UniBE Contributor:

Stegmayer, Katharina; Vanbellingen, Tim; Pastore-Wapp, Manuela; Bertschi, Manuel; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Abela, Eugenio; Weder, Bruno; Walther, Sebastian and Bohlhalter, Stephan

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2213-1582

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Martin Zbinden

Date Deposited:

24 Oct 2017 16:49

Last Modified:

01 Feb 2018 16:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.nicl.2017.07.007

PubMed ID:

28765808

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Coin rotation Dexterity Executive control Functional connectivity Hippocampus

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.102473

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/102473

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