Nanotoxicology: a perspective and discussion of whether or not in vitro testing is a valid alternative

Clift, Martin J D; Gehr, Peter; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara (2011). Nanotoxicology: a perspective and discussion of whether or not in vitro testing is a valid alternative. Archives of toxicology, 85(7), pp. 723-31. Berlin: Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00204-010-0560-6

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Despite the many proposed advantages related to nanotechnology, there are increasing concerns as to the potential adverse human health and environmental effects that the production of, and subsequent exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) might pose. In regard to human health, these concerns are founded upon the plethora of knowledge gained from research relating to the effects observed following exposure to environmental air pollution. It is known that increased exposure to environmental air pollution can cause reduced respiratory health, as well as exacerbate pre-existing conditions such as cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Such disease states have also been associated with exposure to the NP component contained within environmental air pollution, raising concerns as to the effects of NP exposure. It is not only exposure to accidentally produced NPs however, which should be approached with caution. Over the past decades, NPs have been specifically engineered for a wide range of consumer, industrial and technological applications. Due to the inevitable exposure of NPs to humans, owing to their use in such applications, it is therefore imperative that an understanding of how NPs interact with the human body is gained. In vivo research poses a beneficial model for gaining immediate and direct knowledge of human exposure to such xenobiotics. This research outlook however, has numerous limitations. Increased research using in vitro models has therefore been performed, as these models provide an inexpensive and high-throughput alternative to in vivo research strategies. Despite such advantages, there are also various restrictions in regard to in vitro research. Therefore, the aim of this review, in addition to providing a short perspective upon the field of nanotoxicology, is to discuss (1) the advantages and disadvantages of in vitro research and (2) how in vitro research may provide essential information pertaining to the human health risks posed by NP exposure.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy > Topographical and Clinical Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy

UniBE Contributor:

Clift, Martin; Gehr, Peter and Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

ISSN:

0340-5761

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:09

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2018 14:04

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00204-010-0560-6

PubMed ID:

20499226

Web of Science ID:

000291739900003

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.1034

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/1034 (FactScience: 201730)

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