Recent advances into understanding some aspects of the structure and function of mammalian and avian lungs

Maina, J N; West, J B; Orgeig, S; Foot, N J; Daniels, C B; Kiama, S G; Gehr, P; Mühlfeld, C; Blank, F; Müller, L; Lehmann, A; Brandenberger, C; Rothen-Rutishauser, B (2010). Recent advances into understanding some aspects of the structure and function of mammalian and avian lungs. Physiological and biochemical zoology, 83(5), pp. 792-807. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press 10.1086/652244

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Recent findings are reported about certain aspects of the structure and function of the mammalian and avian lungs that include (a) the architecture of the air capillaries (ACs) and the blood capillaries (BCs); (b) the pulmonary blood capillary circulatory dynamics; (c) the adaptive molecular, cellular, biochemical, compositional, and developmental characteristics of the surfactant system; (d) the mechanisms of the translocation of fine and ultrafine particles across the airway epithelial barrier; and (e) the particle-cell interactions in the pulmonary airways. In the lung of the Muscovy duck Cairina moschata, at least, the ACs are rotund structures that are interconnected by narrow cylindrical sections, while the BCs comprise segments that are almost as long as they are wide. In contrast to the mammalian pulmonary BCs, which are highly compliant, those of birds practically behave like rigid tubes. Diving pressure has been a very powerful directional selection force that has influenced phenotypic changes in surfactant composition and function in lungs of marine mammals. After nanosized particulates are deposited on the respiratory tract of healthy human subjects, some reach organs such as the brain with potentially serious health implications. Finally, in the mammalian lung, dendritic cells of the pulmonary airways are powerful agents in engulfing deposited particles, and in birds, macrophages and erythrocytes are ardent phagocytizing cellular agents. The morphology of the lung that allows it to perform different functions-including gas exchange, ventilation of the lung by being compliant, defense, and secretion of important pharmacological factors-is reflected in its "compromise design."

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy > Topographical and Clinical Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Pneumology

UniBE Contributor:

Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Gehr, Peter and Blank, Fabian

ISSN:

1522-2152

Publisher:

University of Chicago Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:09

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2015 19:10

Publisher DOI:

10.1086/652244

PubMed ID:

20687843

Web of Science ID:

000281127500010

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/1041 (FactScience: 201737)

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