Nurse interventions to improve medication adherence among discharged older adults: a systematic review.

Verloo, Henk; Chiolero, Arnaud; Kiszio, Blanche; Kampel, Thomas; Santschi, Valérie (2017). Nurse interventions to improve medication adherence among discharged older adults: a systematic review. Age and ageing, 46(5), pp. 747-754. Oxford University Press 10.1093/ageing/afx076

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Background

discharged older adult inpatients are often prescribed numerous medications. However, they only take about half of their medications and many stop treatments entirely. Nurse interventions could improve medication adherence among this population.

Objective

to conduct a systematic review of trials that assessed the effects of nursing interventions to improve medication adherence among discharged, home-dwelling and older adults.

Method

we conducted a systematic review according to the methods in the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook and reported results according to the PRISMA statement. We searched for controlled clinical trials (CCTs) and randomised CCTs (RCTs), published up to 8 November 2016 (using electronic databases, grey literature and hand searching), that evaluated the effects of nurse interventions conducted alone or in collaboration with other health professionals to improve medication adherence among discharged older adults. Medication adherence was defined as the extent to which a patient takes medication as prescribed.

Results

out of 1,546 records identified, 82 full-text papers were evaluated and 14 studies were included-11 RCTs and 2 CCTs. Overall, 2,028 patients were included (995 in intervention groups; 1,033 in usual-care groups). Interventions were nurse-led in seven studies and nurse-collaborative in seven more. In nine studies, adherence was higher in the intervention group than in the usual-care group, with the difference reaching statistical significance in eight studies. There was no substantial difference in increased medication adherence whether interventions were nurse-led or nurse-collaborative. Four of the 14 studies were of relatively high quality.

Conclusion

nurse-led and nurse-collaborative interventions moderately improved adherence among discharged older adults. There is a need for large, well-designed studies using highly reliable tools for measuring medication adherence.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)

UniBE Contributor:

Chiolero, Arnaud

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0002-0729

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

12 Sep 2017 11:38

Last Modified:

02 Sep 2020 02:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/ageing/afx076

PubMed ID:

28510645

Uncontrolled Keywords:

medication adherence nurse intervention nurse-collaborative interventions nurse-led interventions older people systematic review

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.105352

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/105352

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