Brachyspira hyodysenteriae detection in the large intestine of slaughtered pigs.

Zeeh, Friederike; De Luca, Silvio; Nicholson, Pamela; Grützner, Niels; Nathues, Christina; Perreten, Vincent; Nathues, Heiko (2018). Brachyspira hyodysenteriae detection in the large intestine of slaughtered pigs. Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation, 30(1), pp. 56-63. American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians AAVLD 10.1177/1040638717722816

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Detection of subclinical Brachyspira hyodysenteriae infection in pig herds using feces is challenging. However, the ability to detect the pathogen in intestinal samples of slaughtered pigs has not been investigated, to our knowledge. Therefore, we determined the detection of B. hyodysenteriae in the colon, cecum, and rectum from slaughtered pigs. We analyzed the correlation between detection rates and intestinal lesions, ingesta or fecal consistency, and time from sample collection until processing. A total of 400 ingesta-mucosal (colon, cecum) and 200 fecal (rectum) samples from 200 pigs originating from 20 different herds were bacteriologically examined using selective culture followed by Brachyspira spp. identification by PCR and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Ingesta or fecal consistency and intestinal lesions were scored. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae was detected in 23 samples from 16 intestines originating from 7 herds. Brachyspira spp. were detected in 96 samples. More intestinal (16) than fecal (7) samples tested positive for B. hyodysenteriae. For Brachyspira spp., this difference was significant (69 vs. 27; p < 0.01). In particular, colon samples tested positive ( n = 42, p = 0.06). Most (91%) of the intestines showed no lesions typical for clinical B. hyodysenteriae infection, and median ingesta or fecal consistency was "soft and formed," indicating subclinical infection, colonization, or absence of infection. Ingesta from slaughtered pigs, in particular from the colon and sites with lesions, is useful material for detection of B. hyodysenteriae.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Swine Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology

UniBE Contributor:

Zeeh, Friederike; Nicholson, Pamela; Grützner, Niels; Nathues, Christina; Perreten, Vincent and Nathues, Heiko

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

1040-6387

Publisher:

American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians AAVLD

Language:

English

Submitter:

Daniela Fasel

Date Deposited:

21 Nov 2017 10:36

Last Modified:

28 Dec 2017 01:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1177/1040638717722816

PubMed ID:

28906177

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Cecum colon detection techniques digestive system mass spectrometry spirochete swine dysentery

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/105704

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