Glacial/interglacial wetland, biomass burning, and geologic methane emissions constrained by dual stable isotopic CH₄ ice core records

Bock, Michael; Schmitt, Jochen; Beck, Jonas; Seth, Barbara; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Fischer, Hubertus (2017). Glacial/interglacial wetland, biomass burning, and geologic methane emissions constrained by dual stable isotopic CH₄ ice core records. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - PNAS, 114(29), E5778-E5786. National Academy of Sciences NAS 10.1073/pnas.1613883114

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Atmospheric methane (CH₄) records reconstructed from polar ice cores represent an integrated view on processes predominantly taking place in the terrestrial biogeosphere. Here, we present dual stable isotopic methane records [δ13CH₄ and δD(CH₄)] from four Antarctic ice cores, which provide improved constraints on past changes in natural methane sources. Our isotope data show that tropical wetlands and seasonally inundated floodplains are most likely the controlling sources of atmospheric methane variations for the current and two older interglacials and their preceding glacial maxima. The changes in these sources are steered by variations in temperature, precipitation, and the water table as modulated by insolation, (local) sea level, and monsoon intensity. Based on our δD(CH₄) constraint, it seems that geologic emissions of methane may play a steady but only minor role in atmospheric CH₄ changes and that the glacial budget is not dominated by these sources. Superimposed on the glacial/interglacial variations is a marked difference in both isotope records, with systematically higher values during the last 25,000 y compared with older time periods. This shift cannot be explained by climatic changes. Rather, our isotopic methane budget points to a marked increase in fire activity, possibly caused by biome changes and accumulation of fuel related to the late Pleistocene megafauna extinction, which took place in the course of the last glacial.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Physics Institute > Climate and Environmental Physics
10 Strategic Research Centers > Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR)

UniBE Contributor:

Bock, Michael; Schmitt, Jochen; Beck, Jonas; Seth, Barbara and Fischer, Hubertus

Subjects:

500 Science > 530 Physics

ISSN:

0027-8424

Publisher:

National Academy of Sciences NAS

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Rätz

Date Deposited:

22 Nov 2017 10:51

Last Modified:

21 Mar 2019 17:47

Publisher DOI:

10.1073/pnas.1613883114

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.106529

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/106529

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