Effectiveness of protective patient equipment for CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study

Ott, Barbara; Stüssi, Anja; Mini, Roberto (2010). Effectiveness of protective patient equipment for CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study. Radiation protection dosimetry, 142(2-4), pp. 213-21. Oxford: Oxford University Press 10.1093/rpd/ncq214

[img]
Preview
Text
ncq214.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (213kB) | Preview

Protective patient equipment for CT examinations is not routinely provided. The aim of this study was to determine whether, and if so what, specific protective equipment is beneficial during CT scans. The absorbed organ doses and the effective doses for thorax, abdomen/pelvis and brain CT investigation with and without the use of protective patient equipment have been determined and compared. All measurements were carried out on modern multislice CT scanner using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescence dosemeters. The measurements show that protective equipment reduces the dose within the scattered beam area. The highest organ dose reduction was found in organs that protrude from the trunk like the testes or the female breasts that can largely be covered by the protective equipment. The most reduction of the effective dose was found in the male abdomen/pelvis examination (0.32 mSv), followed by the brain (0.11 mSv) and the thorax (0.06 mSv). It is concluded that the use of protective equipment can reduce the applied dose to the patient.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Radiation Oncology > Medical Radiation Physics

UniBE Contributor:

Barbara, Ott and Mini, Roberto

ISSN:

0144-8420

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:09

Last Modified:

27 Apr 2018 08:41

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/rpd/ncq214

PubMed ID:

20829205

Web of Science ID:

000285196800018

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.1067

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/1067 (FactScience: 201792)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback