Regulation of Sulfate Assimilation by Nitrogen Nutrition in the Duckweed Lemna minor L.

Brunold, Christian; Suter, Marianne (1984). Regulation of Sulfate Assimilation by Nitrogen Nutrition in the Duckweed Lemna minor L. Plant Physiology, 76(3), pp. 579-583. American Society of Plant Physiologists 10.1104/pp.76.3.579

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The effect of nitrate and ammonium on the extractable activity of two enzymes of assimilatory sulfate reduction, ATP sulfurylase (EC 2.7.7.4) and adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase (APSSTase), was examined in Lemna minor L. cultivated under steady state conditions. Nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) was measured for comparison. Low nitrate concentrations (0.2 and 0.04 millimolar) caused a decrease in the specific activity of all three enzymes measured. Twenty-four hours after transfer to medium without a nitrogen source, the specific activity of APSSTase and nitrate reductase was at less than 30% of the original level, whereas ATP sulfurylase was still at about 80%. NH4+ added to the nutrient solution caused a 50 to 100% increase in the specific activity of APSSTase within 24 hours, followed by a slow decrease. After 72 hours with NH4+, the specific activity was still 25% higher than originally. During the same period, the extractable protein increased by 30% on a fresh weight basis, and total protein by 55 to 60%. Nitrate reductase activity decreased to less than 5%. After omission of NH4+ from the nutrient solution extractable APSSTase activity rapidly decreased to the level of cultures with NO3− as a nitrogen source. Using [35S]SO42− as a sulfur source, an increased incorporation of label into the protein fraction could be detected when NH4+ was added to the nutrient solution. This indicated that more sulfate was assimilated and used for protein synthesis. The higher extractable activity of APSSTase with NH4+ may be a regulatory mechanism involved in the formation of sufficient sulfur amino acids during a period of increased protein synthesis.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Stress Physiology (discontinued)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Brunold, Christian and Suter, Marianne

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0032-0889

Publisher:

American Society of Plant Physiologists

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

13 Jun 2018 17:44

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2019 07:49

Publisher DOI:

10.1104/pp.76.3.579

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.107371

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/107371

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