Assessing the association between changing NRTIs when initiating second-line ART and treatment outcomes.

Rohr, Julia K; Ive, Prudence; Horsburgh, C Robert; Berhanu, Rebecca; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Wood, Robin; Boulle, Andrew; Giddy, Janet; Prozesky, Hans; Vinikoor, Michael; Mwanza, Mwanza Wa; Wandeler, Gilles; Davies, Mary-Ann; Fox, Matthew P (2018). Assessing the association between changing NRTIs when initiating second-line ART and treatment outcomes. Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes JAIDS, 77(4), pp. 413-416. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001611

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BACKGROUND After first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure, the importance of change in nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) in second-line is uncertain due to the high potency of protease inhibitors used in second-line. SETTING We used clinical data from 6,290 adult patients in South Africa and Zambia from the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS-Southern Africa cohort. METHODS We included patients who initiated on standard first-line ART and had evidence of first-line failure. We used propensity score-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the impact of change in NRTI on second-line failure compared to remaining on the same NRTI in second-line. In South Africa, where viral load monitoring was available, treatment failure was defined as two consecutive viral loads >1,000 copies/mL. In Zambia, it was defined as two consecutive CD4 counts <100 cells/mm. RESULTS Among patients in South Africa initiated on zidovudine, the adjusted hazard ratio for second-line virologic failure was 0.25 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.57) for those switching to tenofovir vs. remaining on zidovudine. Among patients in South Africa initiated on tenofovir, switching to zidovudine in second-line was associated with reduced second-line failure (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.35 [95% CI: 0.13, 0.96]). In Zambia where viral load monitoring was not available, results were less conclusive. CONCLUSION Changing NRTI in second-line was associated with better clinical outcomes in South Africa. Additional clinical trial research regarding second-line NRTI choices for patients initiated on tenofovir or with contraindications to specific NRTIs is needed.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Infectiology

UniBE Contributor:

Wandeler, Gilles

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0894-9255

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Annelies Luginbühl

Date Deposited:

25 Jan 2018 15:38

Last Modified:

05 Dec 2018 02:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/QAI.0000000000001611

PubMed ID:

29206723

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.107915

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/107915

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