Neurofeedback-Based Enhancement of Single Trial Auditory Evoked Potentials: Feasibility in Healthy Subjects.

Rieger, Kathryn; Rarra, Marie-Helene Margarete Philomena; Moor, Nicolas; Díaz Hernàndez, Laura; Bänninger, Anja; Razavi, Nadja; Dierks, Thomas; Hubl, Daniela; König, Thomas (2018). Neurofeedback-Based Enhancement of Single Trial Auditory Evoked Potentials: Feasibility in Healthy Subjects. Clinical EEG and neuroscience, 49(2), pp. 79-92. Sage 10.1177/1550059417708935

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Previous studies showed a global reduction of the event-related potential component N100 in patients with schizophrenia, a phenomenon that is even more pronounced during auditory verbal hallucinations. This reduction assumingly results from dysfunctional activation of the primary auditory cortex by inner speech, which reduces its responsiveness to external stimuli. With this study, we tested the feasibility of enhancing the responsiveness of the primary auditory cortex to external stimuli with an upregulation of the event-related potential component N100 in healthy control subjects. A total of 15 healthy subjects performed 8 double-sessions of EEG-neurofeedback training over 2 weeks. The results of the used linear mixed effect model showed a significant active learning effect within sessions ( t = 5.99, P < .001) against an unspecific habituation effect that lowered the N100 amplitude over time. Across sessions, a significant increase in the passive condition ( t = 2.42, P = .03), named as carry-over effect, was observed. Given that the carry-over effect is one of the ultimate aims of neurofeedback, it seems reasonable to apply this neurofeedback training protocol to influence the N100 amplitude in patients with schizophrenia. This intervention could provide an alternative treatment option for auditory verbal hallucinations in these patients.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center

UniBE Contributor:

Rieger, Kathryn; Rarra, Marie-Helene Margarete Philomena; Moor, Nicolas; Díaz Hernàndez, Laura; Bänninger, Anja; Razavi, Nadja; Dierks, Thomas; Hubl, Daniela and König, Thomas

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

1550-0594

Publisher:

Sage

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thomas König

Date Deposited:

29 Dec 2017 14:29

Last Modified:

10 Feb 2018 01:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1177/1550059417708935

PubMed ID:

28516807

Additional Information:

Daniela Hubl and Thomas Koenig contributed equally

Uncontrolled Keywords:

N100 auditory verbal hallucinations event-related potentials habituation learning neurofeedback

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.108247

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/108247

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