Neuropsychological Correlates of Suicidal Behavior

Hodgkinson, Steve; Jandl, Martin; Kaschka, Wolfgang P (2017). Neuropsychological Correlates of Suicidal Behavior. Nervenheilkunde, 36(4), pp. 221-226. Schattauer

[img] Text
nh3564_Hodgkinson_T.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (119kB) | Request a copy

Cognitive theories of suicidal behavior postulate that the behavior of a suicidal individual stems from their irrational thoughts about negative and unpleasant events. Cognitive neuropsychology aims to understand how these (aberrant) cognitive processes relate to areas of the brain responsible for memory, speech, pattern recognition and problem-solving. Several neuropsychological correlates of suicidal behavior have been identified and a battery of neuropsychological tests have been used to compare individuals exhibiting suicidal behavior with those that do not. Drawing on the available research literature, we ask whether suicidal behavior has a distinct neuropsychological ’signature’ and if so, what this signature tells us about its aetiology.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Jandl, Martin

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0722-1541

Publisher:

Schattauer

Language:

German

Submitter:

Martin Jandl

Date Deposited:

29 Dec 2017 14:36

Last Modified:

22 Oct 2019 18:38

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.108351

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/108351

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback