Prefrontal Anatomical Architecture and Top-Down Behavioral Control in Human and Nonhuman Primates

Morishima, Yosuke (2017). Prefrontal Anatomical Architecture and Top-Down Behavioral Control in Human and Nonhuman Primates. In: Shigeno, Shuichi; Murakami, Yasunori; Nomura, Tadashi (eds.) Brain Evolution by Design (pp. 367-384). Springer 10.1007/978-4-431-56469-0_16

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Primates, including humans, have great cognitive capability, can adapt to their environments, and have a brain is characterized by a large volume of prefrontal cortex. In this chapter, I provide an overview on how the primate prefrontal cortex differs from that of other species, and I discuss the structural similarities and differences of the prefrontal cortex among primate species. In particular, I discuss how the human prefrontal cortex has unique characteristics among primate species. I also provide an overview of the neural mechanisms of top-down control of visual attention and discuss how cognitive research in human and non-human primates is integrated to understand brain mechanisms. In summary, I will argue that comparative and integrative approaches aid the understanding of the biological basis of human cognition.

Item Type:

Book Section (Book Chapter)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center

UniBE Contributor:

Morishima, Yosuke

ISBN:

978-4-431-56469-0

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Yosuke Morishima

Date Deposited:

15 Jan 2018 11:53

Last Modified:

03 Nov 2019 23:07

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/978-4-431-56469-0_16

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.108658

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/108658

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