Exposure to silver nanoparticles affects viability and function of natural killer cells, mostly via the release of ions.

Müller-Urech, Loretta Lina; Steiner, Selina K; Rodriguez-Lorenzo, Laura; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Latzin, Philipp (2018). Exposure to silver nanoparticles affects viability and function of natural killer cells, mostly via the release of ions. Cell biology and toxicology, 34(3), pp. 167-176. Springer 10.1007/s10565-017-9403-z

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Natural killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses, especially during viral infections and tumor surveillance. They have two major effector functions: the killing of stressed/abnormal cells and the release of cytokines. Their activity is regulated via inhibitory and activating surface receptors. At the same time that the production and use of engineered nanoparticles is steadily increasing, the risk for exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from consumer products or biomedical applications is growing. Given this, we assessed the effects of 20-nm big AgNPs on NK cells, which represent an important part of the immune system. Our study involved overnight exposure of human blood NK cells to different concentrations of AgNPs, and silver (Ag) ion controls, and analyzing them for viability, surface receptor expression, intracellular markers, cytokine release, and killing potential. Exposure to AgNPs, but not to Ag ion controls, reduced the viability and the cytotoxic potential after polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid stimulation of NK cells and increased the expression of the inhibitory receptor CD159a. Exposure to AgNPs and Ag ion controls reduced the expression of the activating receptors CD335 and of CD16 and increased the expression of the activating receptor CD314. Overall, exposure to AgNPs changes NK cells' function and phenotype and may present a risk for modulating human immune responses, which should be further investigated.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Unit Childrens Hospital > Forschungsgruppe Pneumologie (Pädiatrie)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine > Paediatric Pneumology

UniBE Contributor:

Müller-Urech, Loretta Lina and Latzin, Philipp

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1573-6822

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Romy Melanie Rodriguez Del Rio

Date Deposited:

20 Feb 2018 08:56

Last Modified:

04 Nov 2019 19:38

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s10565-017-9403-z

PubMed ID:

28721573

Uncontrolled Keywords:

CD16 CD314 (NKG2D) Cytotoxicity Engineered nanoparticles Viral infection

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.109246

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/109246

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