High Heritability of Adolescent Sleep-Wake Behavior on Free, but not School Days: A Long-Term Twin Study

Inderkum, A P; Tarokh, Leila (2018). High Heritability of Adolescent Sleep-Wake Behavior on Free, but not School Days: A Long-Term Twin Study. Sleep, 41(3) American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10.1093/sleep/zsy004

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Adolescence development is characterized by significant changes in sleep biology. Despite an overall decline in sleep duration and a delay in bedtime, significant interindividual variation in sleep has been reported. The aim of the current study was to examine genetic and environmental influences on sleep in adolescence using long-term (6 month) actigraphy measurements, differentiating between school and free days. Sixteen monozygotic (n = 32) and 10 dizygotic (n = 20) twin pairs (mean age 12.8 ± 1.0 years; 25 females) participated in the study. Structural equation modeling was used to compute genetic, shared environmental and unique environmental contributors to sleep behavior. We found significantly more genetic influence on sleep timing (sleep midpoint; school: 14%, free: 90%) and duration (school: 15%; free: 68%) on free compared with school days. On the other hand, the genetic influence on measures of sleep quality (sleep efficiency and sleep onset latency) was high (>60%) and less dependent on the day of measurement. Only wake after sleep onset (WASO) exhibited a strong shared environmental influence (> 52%) on both school and free days, suggesting that behavioral/environmental interventions may help reduce WASO. In addition, self-reported chronotype was also highly genetically influenced (75%). Disrupted, ill-timed, and insufficient sleep in adolescence is associated with poor mental and physical health outcomes. Our findings of a strong genetic contribution to sleep in adolescence suggest that sleep may mark a genetic vulnerability to poor outcomes.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Research Division

UniBE Contributor:

Tarokh, Leila

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0161-8105

Publisher:

American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Language:

English

Submitter:

Livia Hug

Date Deposited:

09 Apr 2018 15:20

Last Modified:

01 Nov 2019 18:40

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/sleep/zsy004

PubMed ID:

29329461

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.109318

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/109318

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