Age effect on prevalence of ultra-high risk for psychosis symptoms: replication in a clinical sample of an early detection of psychosis service

Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Hubl, Daniela; Schimmelmann, BG; Michel, C (2017). Age effect on prevalence of ultra-high risk for psychosis symptoms: replication in a clinical sample of an early detection of psychosis service. European child & adolescent psychiatry, 26(11), pp. 1401-1405. Springer 10.1007/s00787-017-0994-y

[img] Text
10.1007%2Fs00787-017-0994-y.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (433kB) | Request a copy

Higher frequencies of perceptual and lesser clinical significance of non-perceptual attenuated psychotic symptoms (APS) have been reported by 8- to 15-year-old of the general population compared to 16- to 40-year-old. We examined if such an age-effect can also be detected in a clinical never-psychotic sample (N = 133) referred to a specialized service for clinical suspicion of developing psychosis. APS and brief intermittent psychotic symptoms (BIPS) were assessed using items P1-P3 and P5 (non-perceptual), and P4 (perceptual) of the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes, current axis-I disorders with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and psychosocial functioning with the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale. In the sample, 64% reported APS (61%) or BIPS (7%); any perceptual APS/BIPS was reported by 43% and any non-perceptual APS/BIPS by 44%. In correspondence to the results in the general population sample, perceptual but not non-perceptual APS/BIPS were significantly more frequent in younger age groups below the age of 16 (8-12 years: odds ratio (OR) = 4.7 (1.1-19.5); 13-15 years: OR = 2.7 (0.9-7.7); 20-24-year-old as reference group). An age-effect of APS/BIPS on the presence of any current axis-I disorder (59%) or functional difficulties (67%) was not detected. However, when onset requirements of APS criteria (onset/worsening in past year) were met, the likelihood of a psychiatric diagnosis increased significantly with advancing age. Overall, the replicated age-effect on perceptual APS/BIPS in this clinical sample highlights the need to examine ways to distinguish clinically relevant perceptual APS/BIPS from perceptual aberrations likely remitting over the course of adolescence.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Research Division

UniBE Contributor:

Schultze-Lutter, Frauke and Hubl, Daniela

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1018-8827

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Livia Hug

Date Deposited:

07 Mar 2018 17:56

Last Modified:

07 Mar 2018 17:58

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00787-017-0994-y

PubMed ID:

28456857

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Age, Attenuated psychotic symptoms, Development, Psychosis, Ultra-high risk

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.109353

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/109353

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback