Extensive Microhemorrhages of the Cerebellar Peduncles After High-Altitude Cerebral Edema.

Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline Renée; Hoigné-Perret, Philipp; Kottke, Raimund (2017). Extensive Microhemorrhages of the Cerebellar Peduncles After High-Altitude Cerebral Edema. High altitude medicine & biology, 18(2), pp. 182-184. Mary Ann Liebert 10.1089/ham.2016.0103

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Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline, Philipp Hoigné-Perret, and Raimund Kottke. Extensive microhemorrhages of the cerebellar peduncles after high-altitude cerebral edema. High Alt Med Biol. 18:182-184, 2017.-Neuromagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of subjects who suffered from high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) typically shows cerebral microhemorrhages (MH) of the corpus callosum, in particular the splenium, and supratentorial white matter. This is a case report of a 43-year-old male, who suffered from unusually prolonged severe ataxia and amnesia after having been rescued during the ascent to Mount Everest at 6400 m. MRI of the brain 63 days after the incident showed the typical MH in the corpus callosum, but, in addition, extensive MH were found in the middle cerebellar peduncles. These infratentorial MH might reflect the pronounced atactic gait disorder. This case describes the first HACE-associated MH in the cerebellar peduncles in a high-altitude mountaineer indicating a potential vulnerability of infratentorial brain areas to hypobaric hypoxia.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Pneumology

UniBE Contributor:

Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline Renée

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1527-0297

Publisher:

Mary Ann Liebert

Language:

English

Submitter:

Rahel Holderegger

Date Deposited:

13 Mar 2018 16:32

Last Modified:

13 Mar 2018 16:40

Publisher DOI:

10.1089/ham.2016.0103

PubMed ID:

28128652

Uncontrolled Keywords:

acute mountain sickness amnesia ataxia cerebellar peduncle high-altitude cerebral edema microhemorrhage

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.109377

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/109377

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