How long-lasting is the post-conflict slowing after incongruent trials? Evidence from the Stroop, Simon, and Flanker tasks

Rey-Mermet, Alodie; Meier, Beat (2017). How long-lasting is the post-conflict slowing after incongruent trials? Evidence from the Stroop, Simon, and Flanker tasks. Attention, perception, & psychophysics : AP&P, 79(7), pp. 1945-1967. Springer 10.3758/s13414-017-1348-z

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The purpose of the present study was to determine how long-lasting the post-conflict slowing following incongruent stimuli is. In previous research, incongruent stimuli have been used to induce a conflict because they have relevant features for two different response alternatives. So far, the post-conflict slowing following incongruent stimuli has mainly been assessed up to one trial. In the first two experiments, we assessed the persistence of the post-conflict slowing across several trials. To this end, we presented a few incongruent stimuli among non-conflict stimuli. The results showed a consistent slowing for the first few trials immediately following the incongruent trials. In addition, a sporadic slowing was still found on later trials. In two subsequent experiments, we investigated to what extent the infrequency of incongruent trials - rather than their conflict - induced this slowing. To determine this, we used the same design as in the first two experiments, but we presented non-conflict stimuli as infrequent stimuli. The results showed a slowing on one subsequent trial, ruling out the possibility that the post-conflict slowing following incongruent trials was only caused by infrequency. Together, the findings of the present study indicate that the conflict induced by incongruent trials can have a longer lasting impact on subsequent trials than previously thought.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Psychological and Behavioral Health

UniBE Contributor:

Rey-Mermet, Alodie Denise and Meier, Beat

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1943-3921

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Beat Meier

Date Deposited:

24 Apr 2018 10:26

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 10:37

Publisher DOI:

10.3758/s13414-017-1348-z

PubMed ID:

28608273

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.110478

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/110478

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