Cigarette smoking and cerebral blood flow in a cohort of middle-aged adults.

Elbejjani, Martine; Auer, Reto; Dolui, Sudipto; Jacobs, David R; Haight, Thaddeus; Goff, David C; Detre, John A; Davatzikos, Christos; Bryan, R Nick; Launer, Lenore J (2019). Cigarette smoking and cerebral blood flow in a cohort of middle-aged adults. Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism, 39(7), pp. 1247-1257. Nature Publishing Group 10.1177/0271678X18754973

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Cigarette smoking is often associated with dementia. This association is thought to be mediated by hypoperfusion; however, how smoking behavior relates to cerebral blood flow (CBF) remains unclear. Using data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) cohort (mean age = 50; n = 522), we examined the association between smoking behavior (status, cumulative pack-years, age at smoking initiation, and years since cessation) and CBF (arterial spin labeling) in brain lobes and regions linked to dementia. We used adjusted linear regression models and tested whether associations differed between current and former-smokers. Compared to never-smokers, former-smokers had lower CBF in the parietal and occipital lobes, cuneus, precuneus, putamen, and insula; in contrast, current-smokers did not have lower CBF. The relationship between pack-years and CBF was different between current and former-smokers ( p for interaction < 0.05): Among current-smokers, higher pack-years were associated with higher occipital, temporal, cuneus, putamen, insula, hippocampus, and caudate CBF; former-smokers had lower caudate CBF with increasing pack-years. Results show links between smoking and CBF at middle-age in regions implicated in cognitive and compulsive/addictive processes. Differences between current and former smoking suggest that distinct pathological and/or compensatory mechanisms may be involved depending on the timing and history of smoking exposure.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)

UniBE Contributor:

Auer, Reto

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0271-678X

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

06 Feb 2018 08:52

Last Modified:

07 Nov 2019 14:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1177/0271678X18754973

PubMed ID:

29355449

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Cigarette smoking cerebral blood flow cohort middle-age pack-years

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.110983

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/110983

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