Burning Forests, Rising Power: Towards a Constitutionality Process in Mount Carmel Biosphere Reserve

Eid, Ramez; Haller, Tobias (2018). Burning Forests, Rising Power: Towards a Constitutionality Process in Mount Carmel Biosphere Reserve. Human ecology, 46(1), pp. 41-50. Springer 10.1007/s10745-018-9968-z

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Powerful states and elites frequently manage protected areas with little or no concern for historic land uses, people, or governance practices, justified by ideologies that portray these areas as “pure nature” to be protected from humans. New international participatory platforms, such as the UNESCO Man and Biosphere Program, coupled with strategic active agency, have provided an opportunity for challenging the fortress model of conservation in Israel. We examine the change in Israel’s government ecological policies following its failure in managing the Carmel forests, whereby its bargaining power with the local Druze-Arab minority was significantly reduced, opening a window of opportunity for the Druze to take advantage of new UNESCO rules on local participation to create management institutions for the local forest commons.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of Art and Cultural Studies > Institute of Social Anthropology

UniBE Contributor:

Eid, Ramez and Haller, Tobias

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology

ISSN:

0300-7839

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lisa Lüscher

Date Deposited:

16 Apr 2018 17:51

Last Modified:

16 Apr 2018 17:57

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s10745-018-9968-z

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.113446

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/113446

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