Self-presentation in Online Professional Networks: Men's Higher and Women's Lower Facial Prominence in Self-created Profile Images

Sczesny, Sabine; Kaufmann, Michèle C. (2018). Self-presentation in Online Professional Networks: Men's Higher and Women's Lower Facial Prominence in Self-created Profile Images. Frontiers in psychology, 8, p. 2295. Frontiers Research Foundation 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02295

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Men are presented with higher facial prominence than women in the media, a phenomenon that is called face-ism. In naturalistic settings, face-ism effects could be driven by gender biases of photographers and/or by gender differences in self-presentation. The present research is the first to investigate whether women and men themselves create this different facial prominence. In a controlled laboratory study, 61 participants prepared a picture of themselves from a half-body photograph, allegedly to be uploaded to their profile for an online professional network. As expected, men cropped their photos with higher facial prominence than women did. However, women and men did not differ in the self-presentational motivations, goals, strategies, and personality variables under investigation, so that the observed face-ism effect could not be explained with these variables. Generally, the higher participants' physical appearance self-esteem, the higher was their self-created facial prominence.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Social Psychology and Social Neuroscience

UniBE Contributor:

Sczesny, Sabine and Kaufmann, Michèle

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 140 Philosophical schools of thought
100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

1664-1078

Publisher:

Frontiers Research Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Irène Gonce-Gyr

Date Deposited:

09 May 2018 09:02

Last Modified:

25 Oct 2019 22:56

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02295

PubMed ID:

29387029

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.114331

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/114331

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