Sleep characteristics and inflammatory biomarkers among midlife women.

Nowakowski, Sara; Matthews, Karen A; von Känel, Roland; Hall, Martica H; Thurston, Rebecca C (2018). Sleep characteristics and inflammatory biomarkers among midlife women. Sleep, 41(5) Oxford University Press 10.1093/sleep/zsy049

[img] Text
zsy049.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (3MB) | Request a copy

Study Objectives

Research suggests that sleep disturbances are associated with elevated levels of inflammation. Some evidence indicates that women may be particularly vulnerable; increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers with sleep disturbances are primarily observed among women. Midlife, which encompasses the menopause transition, is typically reported as a time of poor sleep. We tested whether poorer objectively measured sleep characteristics were related to a poorer inflammatory profile in midlife women.

Methods

Two hundred ninety-five peri- and postmenopausal women aged 40-60 completed 3 days of wrist actigraphy, physiologic hot flash monitoring, questionnaires (e.g. Berlin sleep apnea risk questionnaire], and a blood draw for the assessment of inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and von Willebrand factor (VWF) antigen. Associations of objective (actigraphy) sleep with inflammatory markers were tested in regression models. Sleep efficiency was inverse log transformed. Covariates included age, race/ethnicity, education, body mass index, sleep apnea risk, homeostatic model assessment (a measure of insulin resistance), systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and physical activity.

Results

In separate models controlling for age, race/ethnicity, and education, lower sleep efficiency was associated with higher IL-6 [b(SE) = .02 (.10), p = .003] and VWF [b(SE) = .02 (.08), p = .002]. More minutes awake after sleep onset was associated with higher VWF [b(SE) = .12 (.06), p = .01]. Findings persisted in multivariable models.

Conclusions

Lower sleep efficiency and more minutes awake after sleep onset were independently associated with higher circulating levels of VWF. Lower sleep efficiency was associated with higher circulating levels of IL-6. These findings suggest that sleep disturbances are associated with greater circulating inflammation in midlife women.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DCR Unit Sahli Building > Forschungsgruppe Neurologie

UniBE Contributor:

von Känel, Roland

ISSN:

1550-9109

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Stefanie Hetzenecker

Date Deposited:

23 May 2018 15:46

Last Modified:

22 Oct 2019 17:40

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/sleep/zsy049

PubMed ID:

29617910

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.114696

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/114696

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback