Epidemiological, behavioural, and clinical factors associated with antimicrobial-resistant gonorrhoea: a review.

Abraha, Million; Egli-Gany, Dianne; Low, Nicola (2018). Epidemiological, behavioural, and clinical factors associated with antimicrobial-resistant gonorrhoea: a review. F1000Research, 7, p. 400. F1000 Research Ltd 10.12688/f1000research.13600.1

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Antimicrobial-resistant is a global public health problem in the 21st century. has developed resistance to all classes of antibiotics used for empirical treatment, and clinical treatment failure caused by extensively resistant strains has been reported. Identifying specific factors associated with an increased risk of antimicrobial-resistant might help to develop strategies to improve antimicrobial stewardship. In this review, we describe the findings of 24 studies, published between 1989 and 2017, that examined epidemiological, behavioural, and clinical factors and their associations with a range of antimicrobial agents used to treat gonorrhoea. Antimicrobial-resistant is more common in older than younger adults and in men who have sex with men compared with heterosexual men and women. Antimicrobial-resistant is less common in some black minority and Aboriginal ethnic groups than in the majority white population in high-income countries. The factors associated with antimicrobial-resistant gonorrhoea are not necessarily those associated with a higher risk of gonorrhoea.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Abraha, Million; Egli, Dianne and Low, Nicola

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

2046-1402

Publisher:

F1000 Research Ltd

Language:

English

Submitter:

Tanya Karrer

Date Deposited:

24 Apr 2018 10:15

Last Modified:

30 Apr 2018 16:02

Publisher DOI:

10.12688/f1000research.13600.1

PubMed ID:

29636908

Additional Information:

Version 1

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Gonorrhoea Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial resistance epidemiology risk factors

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.114833

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/114833

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