Risk of Infectious Complications in Patients Taking Glucocorticosteroids

Stuck, Andreas E.; Minder, Christoph E.; Frey, Felix J. (1989). Risk of Infectious Complications in Patients Taking Glucocorticosteroids. Reviews of infectious diseases, 11(6), pp. 954-963. The University of Chicago Press 10.1093/clinids/11.6.954

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The association between corticosteroid therapy and subsequent infections was calculated by pooling data from 71 controlled clinical trials. The overall rate of infectious complications was 12.7% in the 2,111 patients randomly allocated to systemic corticosteroids and 8.0% in the 2,087 controls (relative risk [RR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–1.9; P < .001). The risk of infection was particularly high in patients with neurologic diseases (RR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.9–4.3; P< .001) and less pronounced in patients with intestinal (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1–1.7; P = .02), hepatic (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.9–2.3; P = .25), and renal (RR>1; P = .03) diseases. The rate was not increased in patients given a daily dose of <10 mg or a cumulative dose of <700 mg of prednisone. With increasing doses the rate of occurrence of infectious complications increased in patients given corticosteroids as well as in patients given placebo, a finding suggesting that not only the corticosteroid but also the underlying disease state account for the steroid-associated infectious complications observed in clinical practice.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Stuck, Andreas; Minder, Christoph Erwin and Frey, Felix

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0162-0886

Publisher:

The University of Chicago Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Marceline Brodmann

Date Deposited:

28 Oct 2020 17:04

Last Modified:

30 Sep 2021 23:21

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/clinids/11.6.954

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.115581

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/115581

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