Multimorbidity: can general practitioners identify the health conditions most important to their patients? Results from a national cross-sectional study in Switzerland.

Déruaz-Luyet, Anouk; N'Goran, Alexandra A; Pasquier, Jérôme; Burnand, Bernard; Bodenmann, Patrick; Zechmann, Stefan; Neuner-Jehle, Stefan; Senn, Nicolas; Widmer, Daniel; Streit, Sven; Zeller, Andreas; Haller, Dagmar M; Herzig, Lilli (2018). Multimorbidity: can general practitioners identify the health conditions most important to their patients? Results from a national cross-sectional study in Switzerland. BMC family practice, 19(1), p. 66. BioMed Central 10.1186/s12875-018-0757-y

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BACKGROUND

Faced with patients suffering from more than one chronic condition, or multimorbidity, general practitioners (GPs) must establish diagnostic and treatment priorities. Patients also set their own priorities to handle the everyday burdens associated with their multimorbidity and these may be different from the priorities established by their GP. A shared patient-GP agenda, driven by knowledge of each other's priorities, would seem central to managing patients with multimorbidity. We evaluated GPs' ability to identify the health condition most important to their patients.

METHODS

Data on 888 patients were collected as part of a cross-sectional Swiss study on multimorbidity in family medicine. For the main analyses on patients-GP agreement, data from 572 of these patients could be included. GPs were asked to identify the two conditions which their patient considered most important, and we tested whether either of them agreed with the condition mentioned as most important by the patient. In the main analysis, we studied the agreement rate between GPs and patients by grouping items medically-related into 46 groups of conditions. Socio-demographic and clinical variables were fitted into univariate and multivariate models.

RESULTS

In 54.9% of cases, GPs were able to identify the health condition most important to the patient. In the multivariate model, the only variable significantly associated with patient-GP agreement was the number of chronic conditions: the higher the number of conditions, the less likely the agreement.

CONCLUSION

GPs were able to correctly identify the health condition most important to their patients in half of the cases. It therefore seems important that GPs learn how to better adapt treatment targets and priorities by taking patients' perspectives into account.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)

UniBE Contributor:

Streit, Sven

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

1471-2296

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

22 May 2018 16:25

Last Modified:

24 Sep 2020 17:01

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12875-018-0757-y

PubMed ID:

29776442

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Family medicine Multimorbidity Patient–provider agreement

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.116675

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/116675

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