Comparison of error-amplification and haptic-guidance training techniques for learning of a timing-based motor task by healthy individuals

Milot, Marie-Hélène; Marchal Crespo, Laura; Green, Christopher S.; Cramer, Steven C.; Reinkensmeyer, David J. (2010). Comparison of error-amplification and haptic-guidance training techniques for learning of a timing-based motor task by healthy individuals. Experimental brain research, 201(2), pp. 119-131. Springer 10.1007/s00221-009-2014-z

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Performance errors drive motor learning for many tasks. Some researchers have suggested that reducing performance errors with haptic guidance can benefit learning by demonstrating correct movements, while others have suggested that artificially increasing errors will force faster and more complete learning. This study compared the effect of these two techniques—haptic guidance and error amplification—as healthy subjects learned to play a computerized pinball-like game. The game required learning to press a button using wrist movement at the correct time to make a flipper hit a falling ball to a randomly positioned target. Errors were decreased or increased using a robotic device that retarded or accelerated wrist movement, based on sensed movement initiation timing errors. After training with either error amplification or haptic guidance, subjects significantly reduced their timing errors and generalized learning to untrained targets. However, for a subset of more skilled subjects, training with amplified errors produced significantly greater learning than training with the reduced errors associated with haptic guidance, while for a subset of less skilled subjects, training with haptic guidance seemed to benefit learning more. These results suggest that both techniques help enhanced performance of a timing task, but learning is optimized if training subjects with the appropriate technique based on their baseline skill level.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Motor Learning and Neurorehabilitation
10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Gerontechnology and Rehabilitation

UniBE Contributor:

Marchal Crespo, Laura

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 620 Engineering

ISSN:

0014-4819

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Angela Amira Botros

Date Deposited:

14 Jun 2018 16:32

Last Modified:

22 Oct 2019 20:49

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00221-009-2014-z

PubMed ID:

19787345

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.117030

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/117030

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