A matched-guise study on L2, heritage, and native Spanish speakers' attitudes to Spanish in the State of Washington

Fernández-Mallat, Víctor; Carey, Max (2017). A matched-guise study on L2, heritage, and native Spanish speakers' attitudes to Spanish in the State of Washington. Sociolinguistic Studies, 11(1), pp. 175-198. Equinox 10.1558/sols.30856

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By means of a matched-guise study, this paper examines the attitudes of L2, heritage, and native Spanish speakers in the state of Washington toward Mexican-accented and English-accented Spanish. We interpret our findings in the wake of previous research on language attitudes and ideologies related to Spanish in the United States which shows that Spanish and those who speak it as a first or heritage language are thought to have a lower socioeconomic status than English and Anglophones. 97 Spanish-speaking participants residing in Washington (N=95) and the Pacific Northwest (N=2) rated 4 voices along six-point semantic differential scales falling into the dimensions of superiority, solidarity, language competence, and physical characteristics. We submitted mean scores to a linear mixed-effects model. Contrary to our expectations, all groups rated the Mexican-accented guises higher than the English-accented guises in the dimension of superiority. Also unforeseen, the L2 speakers rated the Mexican-accented voices higher in the dimension of solidarity. We consider the high level of education of the respondents and, for the L2 subjects, their experience as advanced Spanish language speakers, as likely explanations for the observed attenuation of well-documented prevailing stereotypes directed at Latinos from the monolingual community at large.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies > Institute of Spanish Languages and Literature
06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies > Institute of Spanish Languages and Literature > Linguistic Studies

UniBE Contributor:

Fernandez, Victor Orlando

Subjects:

800 Literature, rhetoric & criticism > 860 Spanish & Portuguese literatures
400 Language > 460 Spanish & Portuguese languages
400 Language > 410 Linguistics

ISSN:

1750-8649

Publisher:

Equinox

Language:

English

Submitter:

Victor Orlando Fernandez

Date Deposited:

21 Jun 2018 15:49

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 10:57

Publisher DOI:

10.1558/sols.30856

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Language attitudes; L2 speaker; heritage speakers; native speakers; Mexican-accented Spanish; English-accented Spanish

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.117105

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/117105

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