Major impairments of glutamatergic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of mice lacking the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor-1.

Pachoud, Bastien; Adamantidis, Antoine Roger; Ravassard, Pascal; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Grisar, Thierry; Lakaye, Bernard; Salin, Paul-Antoine (2010). Major impairments of glutamatergic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of mice lacking the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor-1. Journal of neurophysiology, 104(3), pp. 1417-1425. American Physiological Society 10.1152/jn.01052.2009

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The hypothalamic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) plays important roles in energy homeostasis, anxiety, and sleep regulation. Since the MCH receptor-1 (MCH-R1), the only functional receptor that mediates MCH functions in rodents, facilitates behavioral performance in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks, we investigated whether glutamatergic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells could be modulated in mice lacking the MCH-R1 gene (MCH-R1(-/-)). We found that both α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmissions were diminished in the mutant mice compared with their controls. This deficit was explained, at least in part, by a postsynaptic down-regulation of these receptors since the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and the NMDA/AMPA ratio were decreased. Long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) was also impaired in MCH-R1(-/-) mice. This was due to an altered induction, rather than an impaired, expression because repeating the induction stimulus restored LTP to a normal magnitude. In addition, long-term synaptic depression was strongly diminished in MCH-R1(-/-) mice. These results suggest that MCH exerts a facilitatory effect on CA1 glutamatergic synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. Recently, it has been shown that MCH neurons fire exclusively during sleep and mainly during rapid eye movement sleep. Thus these findings provide a mechanism by which sleep might facilitate memory consolidation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Adamantidis, Antoine Roger

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0022-3077

Publisher:

American Physiological Society

Language:

English

Submitter:

Stefanie Hetzenecker

Date Deposited:

11 Jul 2018 16:07

Last Modified:

28 Oct 2019 22:11

Publisher DOI:

10.1152/jn.01052.2009

PubMed ID:

20592115

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.117262

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/117262

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