Optogenetic disruption of sleep continuity impairs memory consolidation.

Rolls, Asya; Colas, Damien; Adamantidis, Antoine Roger; Carter, Matt; Lanre-Amos, Tope; Heller, H Craig; de Lecea, Luis (2011). Optogenetic disruption of sleep continuity impairs memory consolidation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - PNAS, 108(32), pp. 13305-13310. National Academy of Sciences NAS 10.1073/pnas.1015633108

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Memory consolidation has been proposed as a function of sleep. However, sleep is a complex phenomenon characterized by several features including duration, intensity, and continuity. Sleep continuity is disrupted in different neurological and psychiatric conditions, many of which are accompanied by memory deficits. This finding has raised the question of whether the continuity of sleep is important for memory consolidation. However, current techniques used in sleep research cannot manipulate a single sleep feature while maintaining the others constant. Here, we introduce the use of optogenetics to investigate the role of sleep continuity in memory consolidation. We optogenetically targeted hypocretin/orexin neurons, which play a key role in arousal processes. We used optogenetics to activate these neurons at different intervals in behaving mice and were able to fragment sleep without affecting its overall amount or intensity. Fragmenting sleep after the learning phase of the novel object recognition (NOR) task significantly decreased the performance of mice on the subsequent day, but memory was unaffected if the average duration of sleep episodes was maintained at 62-73% of normal. These findings demonstrate the use of optogenetic activation of arousal-related nuclei as a way to systematically manipulate a specific feature of sleep. We conclude that regardless of the total amount of sleep or sleep intensity, a minimal unit of uninterrupted sleep is crucial for memory consolidation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Adamantidis, Antoine Roger

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0027-8424

Publisher:

National Academy of Sciences NAS

Language:

English

Submitter:

Stefanie Hetzenecker

Date Deposited:

28 Jun 2018 15:06

Last Modified:

25 Oct 2019 00:15

Publisher DOI:

10.1073/pnas.1015633108

PubMed ID:

21788501

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.117275

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/117275

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