Visceral larva migrans in French adults: a new disease syndrome?

Glickman, L T; Magnaval, J F; Domanski, L M; Shofer, F S; Lauria, S S; Gottstein, Bruno; Brochier, B (1987). Visceral larva migrans in French adults: a new disease syndrome? American journal of epidemiology, 125(6), pp. 1019-1034. Oxford University Press 10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a114618

[img] Text
125-6-1019.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy

Visceral larva migrans is apparently an endemic disease among adults in southwest France. Thirty-seven adults living in the Midi-Pyrenees region of France were confirmed as having visceral larva migrans based on an increased specific antibody titer to Toxocara canis as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by the Western blot method. The disease was characterized clinically by weakness, pruritus, rash, difficulty breathing, abdominal pain, and pathologically by allergic manifestations including eosinophilia and increased serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels. Conditional logistic regression analysis using a control group of 37 hospital patients with other conditions who were individually matched to patients with visceral larva migrans by age and sex revealed an increased risk for visceral larva migrans associated with hunting or living in a household with a hunter (odds ratio (OR) = 9.0, p = 0.02) and with living in a village of less than 500 persons (OR = 5.7, p = 0.04). Owning two or more dogs compared with owning one or no dogs increased the risk of visceral larva migrans for hunting or living in a household with a hunter (OR = 9.6 vs. OR = 4.5) and for persons living in nonhunting households (OR = 2.1 vs. OR = 1.0). These findings, however, could not be duplicated when 60 age- and sex-matched neighbors were used as a second control group.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Gottstein, Bruno

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0002-9262

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bruno Gottstein

Date Deposited:

18 Jul 2018 12:09

Last Modified:

18 Jul 2018 12:09

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a114618

PubMed ID:

3578244

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.118629

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/118629

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback