A double-antibody sandwich ELISA for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigen in stool samples of humans.

Baumann, D; Gottstein, Bruno (1987). A double-antibody sandwich ELISA for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigen in stool samples of humans. Tropical medicine and parasitology, 38(2), pp. 81-85. Georg Thieme

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

A double-antibody sandwich ELISA was developed to detect detergent-solubilized antigens of Entamoeba histolytica in stool samples of humans. The test system was evaluated for its methodical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. In recovery experiments the lower limit of detection was 400 ng E. histolytica (HK9) protein/ml stool, corresponding to approximately 2000 amoebic trophozoites/ml stool. Samples of 97 patients with suspected intestinal amoebiasis were examined. Specific antigens were detected by ELISA (= positive reaction) in 14 (93%) out of 15 stool samples containing trophozoites of E. histolytica. In contrast, 68 (93%) of 73 samples with other protozoa, including Entamoeba coli, E. hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba buetschlii and Giardia lamblia, did not react in the test system (= negative reaction). The test was shown to detect only trophozoites of E. histolytica and not the cyst stage. This fact could facilitate the differentiation between cyst carriers and persons excreting trophozoites. The results of this preliminary study justify a further large scale evaluation of the test system.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Gottstein, Bruno

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0177-2392

Publisher:

Georg Thieme

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bruno Gottstein

Date Deposited:

19 Jul 2018 09:26

Last Modified:

19 Jul 2018 09:26

PubMed ID:

2888183

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/118630

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback