Giardia lamblia variant surface protein H7 stimulates a heterogeneous repertoire of antibodies displaying differential cytological effects on the parasite.

Stäger, S; Felleisen, R; Gottstein, Bruno; Müller, N (1997). Giardia lamblia variant surface protein H7 stimulates a heterogeneous repertoire of antibodies displaying differential cytological effects on the parasite. Molecular and biochemical parasitology, 85(1), pp. 113-124. Elsevier

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Previous investigations had shown that the Giardia lamblia clone GS/M-83-H7-specific variant surface protein (VSP) H7 consists of at least two antigenically distinct parts: (i) a variable 314-aa N-terminal region which contains one, or more, variant-specific epitopes eliciting a transient and consequently low-level antibody response preferentially detectable during the early phase of G. lamblia infection in mice; and (ii) a 171-aa C-terminal region which contains relatively conserved epitope(s) causing a persistent and consequently high-level antibody response during the later phase of an infection. The present study indicated that monoclonal antibody G10/4 and polyclonal antibodies from early-phase infected or hyperimmunized mice, directed against the variant-specific N-terminal regional exclusively recognized conformational cysteine-containing epitopes. These antibodies caused detachment and aggregation of trophozoites, and exhibited complement-independent cytotoxic effect towards the parasite. In contrast, polyclonal antibodies from late-phase infected mice, directed against the semi-conserved peptidyl structures in the C-terminal region, preferentially reacted with non-conformational epitopes. Such antibodies had no cytotoxic effect, but provoked parasite-detachment and -aggregation. These findings indicated that infection of mice with G. lamblia clone GS/M-83-H7 generates a heterogeneous repertoire of cytologically active anti-VSP antibodies which may have a direct influence on the course of the parasite infection.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology

UniBE Contributor:

Gottstein, Bruno

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0166-6851

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bruno Gottstein

Date Deposited:

23 Jul 2018 09:44

Last Modified:

23 Jul 2018 09:44

PubMed ID:

9108553

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/118718

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