Notoedric and sarcoptic mange in free-ranging lynx from Switzerland.

Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie-Pierre; Ryser, Andreas; Bacciarini, Luca N; Angst, Christof; Gottstein, Bruno; Janovsky, Martin; Breitenmoser, Urs (2002). Notoedric and sarcoptic mange in free-ranging lynx from Switzerland. Journal of wildlife diseases, 38(1), pp. 228-232. Wildlife Disease Association 10.7589/0090-3558-38.1.228

[img] Text
0090-3558-38.1.228.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (173kB) | Request a copy

Between March and December 1999, five free-ranging lynx (Lynx lynx) affected by mange were found dead or shot by game wardens in the Swiss Alps. In the first two cases, Notoedres cati was isolated from the skin; in the third and fourth case, Sarcoptes scabiei was the cause of the infection; and in the fifth case, a mixed infection was diagnosed. Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) affected with sarcoptic mange and domestic cats infested with N. cati are likely to be the sources of infection. It seems improbable that mange will occur as an epidemic in lynx in Switzerland, but losses due to infections with N. cati and/or S. scabiei may have an impact on this small, geographically limited lynx population. This is the first report of notoedric mange in a free-ranging lynx and the first report of mange in lynx from Switzerland.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Center for Fish and Wildlife Health (FIWI)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology

UniBE Contributor:

Gottstein, Bruno and Breitenmoser, Urs

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0090-3558

Publisher:

Wildlife Disease Association

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bruno Gottstein

Date Deposited:

23 Jul 2018 09:35

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2019 17:00

Publisher DOI:

10.7589/0090-3558-38.1.228

PubMed ID:

11838224

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.118809

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/118809

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback