Taeniid history, natural selection and antigenic diversity: evolutionary theory meets helminthology.

Haag, Karen L; Gottstein, Bruno; Ayala, Francisco J (2008). Taeniid history, natural selection and antigenic diversity: evolutionary theory meets helminthology. Trends in parasitology, 24(2), pp. 96-102. Elsevier Current Trends 10.1016/j.pt.2007.11.004

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Large sets of nucleotide sequence data of parasitic helminths have been accumulated in the past two decades. Our ability to improve the health of people and animals using this knowledge has not increased proportionally, however. Evolutionary biology provides the background to understand how parasites adapt to their hosts, and computational molecular biology offers the tools to infer the mechanisms involved. The study of antigenic diversity, a way for parasites to overcome host defenses against parasites, has been neglected in helminths, yet such a study could contribute to the development of more efficient drugs, diagnostic tests and vaccines. This review focuses on the study of adaptive evolution as the cause of antigenic diversity in tapeworms and its potential applications.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology

UniBE Contributor:

Gottstein, Bruno

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

1471-4922

Publisher:

Elsevier Current Trends

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bruno Gottstein

Date Deposited:

23 Jul 2018 11:18

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 23:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.pt.2007.11.004

PubMed ID:

18182327

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.118871

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/118871

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