Epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and control of trichinellosis.

Gottstein, Bruno; Pozio, Edoardo; Nöckler, Karsten (2009). Epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and control of trichinellosis. Clinical microbiology reviews, 22(1), pp. 127-145. American Society for Microbiology ASM 10.1128/CMR.00026-08

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SUMMARY Throughout much of the world, Trichinella spp. are found to be the causative agents of human trichinellosis, a disease that not only is a public health hazard by affecting human patients but also represents an economic problem in porcine animal production and food safety. Due to the predominantly zoonotic importance of infection, the main efforts in many countries have focused on the control of Trichinella or the elimination of Trichinella from the food chain. The most important source of human infection worldwide is the domestic pig, but, e.g., in Europe, meats of horses and wild boars have played a significant role during outbreaks within the past 3 decades. Infection of humans occurs with the ingestion of Trichinella larvae that are encysted in muscle tissue of domestic or wild animal meat. Early clinical diagnosis of trichinellosis is rather difficult because pathognomonic signs or symptoms are lacking. Subsequent chronic forms of the disease are not easy to diagnose, irrespective of parameters including clinical findings, laboratory findings (nonspecific laboratory parameters such as eosinophilia, muscle enzymes, and serology), and epidemiological investigations. New regulations laying down rules for official controls for Trichinella in meat in order to improve food safety for consumers have recently been released in Europe. The evidence that the disease can be monitored and to some extent controlled with a rigorous reporting and testing system in place should be motivation to expand appropriate programs worldwide.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Gottstein, Bruno

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0893-8512

Publisher:

American Society for Microbiology ASM

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bruno Gottstein

Date Deposited:

23 Jul 2018 15:01

Last Modified:

23 Jul 2018 15:01

Publisher DOI:

10.1128/CMR.00026-08

PubMed ID:

19136437

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.118898

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/118898

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