Institutional transition: Internal migration, the propiska, and post-socialist urban change in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Hatcher, Craig; Thieme, Susan (2015). Institutional transition: Internal migration, the propiska, and post-socialist urban change in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. Urban Studies, 53(10), pp. 2175-2191. SAGE 10.1177/0042098015587252

[img] Text
Hatcher_Thieme_UrbanStudies_2015.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (276kB) | Request a copy

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, there has been remarkable enthusiasm for theorising how transitional processes have unfolded in post-socialist cities. In seeking to extend literature that uses the post-socialist condition as a tool for theory building, we draw attention to the ongoing processes of institutional change in post-socialist cities. In doing so, we reject a ‘top-down’ perspective and examine how these institutional transitions are shaped through processes of ‘domestication’, negotiation and contestation between different interest groups in the city. We develop our argument, by drawing attention to the local political debates surrounding the propiska in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. The propiska developed throughout the Soviet Union to control internal migration and is still used today in a less restrictive form. By discussing our case study, we hope to foster attention towards the ongoing contested processes of institutional transition in post-socialist cities.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Integrative Geography > Unit Geography of Sustainable Development
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Integrative Geography

UniBE Contributor:

Thieme, Susan

ISSN:

0042-0980

Publisher:

SAGE

Language:

English

Submitter:

Florian Dolder

Date Deposited:

14 Sep 2018 10:55

Last Modified:

14 Sep 2018 10:55

Publisher DOI:

10.1177/0042098015587252

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.119292

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/119292

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback