Significance of Glutathione Metabolism in Plants Under Stress

Rennenberg, Heinz; Brunold, Christian (1994). Significance of Glutathione Metabolism in Plants Under Stress. In: Behnke, H.-Dietmar; Lüttge, Ulrich; Esser, Karl; Esser, Karl; Runge, Michael (eds.) Structural Botany Physiology Genetics Taxonomy Geobotany. Progress in Botany: Vol. 55 (pp. 142-156). Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer 10.1007/978-3-642-78568-9_8

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In higher plants the tripeptide glutathione (GSH; γ-glu-cys-gly) and its homologs homoglutathione (hGSH; γ-glu-cys-β-ala) and hydroxymethylglutathione (γ-glu-cys-ser) are generally thought to be the most abundant low molecular weight thiols (Kasai and Larsen 1980; Bergmann and Rennenberg 1993). As products of the plant’s primary metabolism, these compounds have received considerable attention during recent years, because they are not only involved in storage and distribution of reduced sulfur within the plant, and hence in the regulation of sulfur nutrition, but are also essential components of the plant’s defence system for environmental stress (Fig. 1).

Item Type:

Book Section (Book Chapter)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Stress Physiology (discontinued)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Brunold, Christian

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0340-4773

ISBN:

978-3-642-78570-2

Series:

Progress in Botany

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

30 Aug 2018 12:23

Last Modified:

29 Oct 2019 09:38

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/978-3-642-78568-9_8

Uncontrolled Keywords:

glutathione metabolism; glutathione synthesis; assimilatory sulfate reduction; sulfur nutrition; herbicide safeners

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.119601

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/119601

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