Sarcoptes-World Molecular Network (Sarcoptes-WMN): integrating research on scabies

Alasaad, S.; Walton, S.; Rossi, L.; Bornstein, S.; Abu-Madi, M.; Soriguer, R.C.; Fitzgerald, S.; Zhu, X.Q.; Zimmermann, W.; Ugbomoiko, U.S.; Pei, K.J.; Heukelbach, J. (2011). Sarcoptes-World Molecular Network (Sarcoptes-WMN): integrating research on scabies. International journal of infectious diseases, 15(5), e294-7. Orlando, Fla.: Elsevier 10.1016/j.ijid.2011.01.012

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Parasites threaten human and animal health globally. It is estimated that more than 60% of people on planet Earth carry at least one parasite, many of them several different species. Unfortunately, parasite studies suffer from duplications and inconsistencies between different investigator groups. Hence, groups need to collaborate in an integrated manner in areas including parasite control, improved therapy strategies, diagnostic and surveillance tools, and public awareness. Parasite studies will be better served if there is coordinated management of field data and samples across multidisciplinary approach plans, among academic and non-academic organizations worldwide. In this paper we report the first 'Living organism-World Molecular Network', with the cooperation of 167 parasitologists from 88 countries on all continents. This integrative approach, the 'Sarcoptes-World Molecular Network', seeks to harmonize Sarcoptes epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and molecular studies from all over the world, with the aim of decreasing mite infestations in humans and animals.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Swine Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Zimmermann, Werner

ISSN:

1201-9712

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:31

Last Modified:

09 May 2019 15:12

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.ijid.2011.01.012

Web of Science ID:

000289506200001

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/11976 (FactScience: 218237)

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