Grandparents of children with cancer: a controlled comparison of perceived family functioning.

Kelada, Lauren; Wakefield, C E; Doolan, E L; Drew, D; Wiener, L; Michel, G; Cohn, R J (2019). Grandparents of children with cancer: a controlled comparison of perceived family functioning. Supportive care in cancer, 27(6), pp. 2087-2094. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00520-018-4468-7

[img] Text
Kelada SupportCareCancer 2018.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (435kB) | Request a copy
[img]
Preview
Text
Kelada SupportCareCancer 2018_postprint.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (368kB) | Preview

PURPOSE Grandparents can be profoundly emotionally affected when a grandchild is diagnosed with cancer. They also often provide invaluable support for the family (e.g., caring for the sick child and/or siblings). Multigenerational family functioning may therefore change. Limited research has assessed grandparents' perspectives after their grandchild is diagnosed with cancer. In this study, we aimed to (1) assess differences in perceived family functioning among grandparents of a child with cancer and grandparents of healthy children and (2) assess the cancer-specific and demographic factors related to perceived family functioning in grandparents of a grandchild with cancer. PROCEDURE Grandparents of a child with cancer (n = 89) and grandparents of healthy children (n = 133) completed the general functioning, communication, and problem-solving scales of the Family Assessment Device. We used multilevel models with a random intercept to detect (1) between-group differences and (2) identify factors related to perceived family functioning among grandparents with a grandchild with cancer. RESULTS Grandparents with a grandchild with cancer reported poorer family functioning than grandparents with healthy grandchildren. Among the grandparents with a grandchild with cancer, impairments in family functioning were correlated with fewer years since diagnosis, providing care to their sick grandchild and/or siblings and living far away from the sick grandchild. CONCLUSIONS The detrimental impact of childhood cancer likely extends beyond the immediate family members. Including grandparents in interventions-beginning at diagnosis-to reduce distress and increase cohesion for families of a child with cancer is warranted, particularly for grandparents who provide care to their sick grandchild or siblings.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Michel, Gisela

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0941-4355

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

20 Sep 2018 15:18

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2019 10:21

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00520-018-4468-7

PubMed ID:

30229340

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Childhood cancer Communication Family functioning Grandparents Problem-solving

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.120052

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/120052

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback