Susceptibility of primary human endothelial cells to C. perfringens beta-toxin suggesting similar pathogenesis in human and porcine necrotizing enteritis

Popescu, F.; Wyder, M.; Gurtner, C.; Frey, J.; Cooke, R.A.; Greenhill, A.R.; Posthaus, H. (2011). Susceptibility of primary human endothelial cells to C. perfringens beta-toxin suggesting similar pathogenesis in human and porcine necrotizing enteritis. Veterinary microbiology, 153(1-2), pp. 173-7. Amsterdam: Elsevier 10.1016/j.vetmic.2011.02.017

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Clostridium perfringens type C causes fatal necrotizing enteritis in different mammalian hosts, most commonly in newborn piglets. Human cases are rare, but the disease, also called pigbel, was endemic in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Lesions in piglets and humans are very similar and characterized by segmental necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in acute cases and fibrino-necrotizing enteritis in subacute cases. Histologically, deep mucosal necrosis accompanied by vascular thrombosis and necrosis was consistently reported in naturally affected pigs and humans. This suggests common pathogenetic mechanisms. Previous in vitro studies using primary porcine aortic endothelial cells suggested that beta-toxin (CPB) induced endothelial damage contributes to the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type C enteritis in pigs. In the present study we investigated toxic effects of CPB on cultured primary human macro- and microvascular endothelial cells. In vitro, these cells were highly sensitive to CPB and reacted with similar cytopathic and cytotoxic effects as porcine endothelial cells. Our results indicate that porcine and human cell culture based in vitro models represent valuable tools to investigate the pathogenesis of this bacterial disease in animals and humans.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Animal Pathology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology

UniBE Contributor:

Popescu, Francesca; Wyder, Marianne; Gurtner, Corinne; Frey, Joachim and Posthaus, Horst

ISSN:

0378-1135

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:31

Last Modified:

21 Jan 2014 15:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.vetmic.2011.02.017

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/12010 (FactScience: 218280)

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