Contrast media enhancement of intracranial lesions in magnetic resonance imaging does not reflect histopathologic findings consistently

Singh, Jeannine; Oevermann, Anna; Lang, Johann; Vandevelde, Marc; Doherr, Marcus; Henke, Diana; Gorgas, Daniela (2011). Contrast media enhancement of intracranial lesions in magnetic resonance imaging does not reflect histopathologic findings consistently. Veterinary radiology & ultrasound, 52(6), pp. 619-26. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell 10.1111/j.1740-8261.2011.01848.x

[img] Text
Brunner (2).pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy

Certain magnetic resonance (MR) enhancement patterns are often considered to be associated with a specific diagnosis but experience shows that this association is not always consistent. Therefore, it is not clear how reliably contrast enhancement patterns correlate with specific tissue changes. We investigated the detailed histomorphologic findings of intracranial lesions in relation to Gadodiamide contrast enhancement in 55 lesions from 55 patients, nine cats, and 46 dogs. Lesions were divided into areas according to their contrast enhancement; therefore 81 areas resulted from the 55 lesions which were directly compared with histopathology. In 40 of 55 lesions (73%), the histomorphologic features explained the contrast enhancement pattern. In particular, vascular proliferation and dilated vessels occurred significantly more often in areas with enhancement than in areas without enhancement (P = 0.044). In 15 lesions, there was no association between MR images and histologic findings. In particular, contrast enhancement was found within necrotic areas (10 areas) and ring enhancement was seen in lesions without central necrosis (five lesions). These findings imply that necrosis cannot be differentiated reliably from viable tissue based on postcontrast images. Diffusion of contrast medium within lesions and time delays after contrast medium administration probably play important roles in the presence and patterns of contrast enhancement. Thus, histologic features of lesions cannot be predicted solely by contrast enhancement patterns.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Neurology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Brunner Singh, Jeannine; Oevermann, Anna; Lang, Johann; Vandevelde, Marc; Doherr, Marcus; Henke, Diana and Schweizer, Daniela Esther

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

1058-8183

Publisher:

Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:31

Last Modified:

01 Nov 2017 12:23

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1740-8261.2011.01848.x

PubMed ID:

21777330

Web of Science ID:

000297574700005

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.12061

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/12061 (FactScience: 218338)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback