Challenges for Natural Hazards and Risk Management in Mountain Regions of Europe

Keiler, Margreth; Fuchs, Sven (2018). Challenges for Natural Hazards and Risk Management in Mountain Regions of Europe. In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Natural Hazard Science. Oxford University Press 10.1093/acrefore/9780199389407.013.322

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European mountain regions are diverse, from gently rolling hills to high mountain areas, and from low populated rural areas to urban regions or from communities dependent on agricultural productions to hubs of tourist industry. Communities in European mountain regions are threatened by different hazard types: for example floods, landslides, or glacial hazards, mostly in a multi-hazard environment. Due to climate change and socioeconomic developments they are challenged by emerging and spatially as well as temporally highly dynamic risks. Consequently, over decades societies in European mountain ranges developed different hazard and risk management strategies on a national to local level, which are presented below focusing on the European Alps. Until the late 19th century, the paradigm of hazard protection was related to engineering measures, mostly implemented in the catchments, and new authorities responsible for mitigation were founded. From the 19th century, more integrative strategies became prominent, becoming manifest in the 1960s with land-use management strategies targeted at a separation of hazardous areas and areas used for settlement and economic purpose. In research and in the application, the concept of hazard mitigation was step by step replaced by the concept of risk. The concept of risk includes three components (or drivers), apart from hazard analysis also the assessment and evaluation of exposure and vulnerability; thus, it addresses in the management of risk reduction all three components. These three drivers are all dynamic, while the concept of risk itself is thus far a static approach. The dynamic of risk drivers is a result of both climate change and socioeconomic change, leading through different combinations either to an increase or a decrease in risk. Consequently, natural hazard and risk management, defined since the 21st century using the complexity paradigm, should acknowledge such dynamics. Moreover, researchers from different disciplines as well as practitioners have to meet the challenges of sustainable development in the European mountains. Thus, they should consider the effects of dynamics in risk drivers (e.g., increasing exposure, increasing vulnerability, changes in magnitude, and frequency of hazard events), and possible effects on development areas. These challenges, furthermore, can be better met in the future by concepts of risk governance, including but not limited to improved land management strategies and adaptive risk management.

Item Type:

Book Section (Encyclopedia Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Physical Geography
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Physical Geography > Unit Geomorphology
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography

UniBE Contributor:

Keiler, Margreth

Subjects:

900 History > 910 Geography & travel

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Chantal Laeticia Schmidt

Date Deposited:

18 Dec 2018 14:48

Last Modified:

18 Dec 2018 14:48

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/acrefore/9780199389407.013.322

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.120880

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/120880

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