Early childhood caries and psychological perceptions on child's oral health increase the feeling of guilt in parents: an epidemiological survey

Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Abanto, Jenny; Pinheiro, Elayne Cristina Morais; Lussi, Adrian; Bönecker, Marcelo (2018). Early childhood caries and psychological perceptions on child's oral health increase the feeling of guilt in parents: an epidemiological survey. International journal of paediatric dentistry, 28(1), pp. 23-32. Wiley 10.1111/ipd.12306

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AIM To assess whether parents feel guilty for their children's oral problems, associating this feeling with socio-economic, demographic, and psychological factors. DESIGN We included 1313 parent-and-child pairs in this study. The children were 2-4 years old. Parents answered questionnaires on socio-economic and demographic data, and on psychological variables. Sixteen trained dentists (κ > 0.8) examined the children for oral hygiene (the presence and absence of plaque), early childhood caries (ECC; no caries, low and high severity), malocclusion (the presence and absence), and traumatic dental injuries (TDI; the presence and absence). We analysed the data with a hierarchical regression. RESULTS Twenty-four percentage of parents reported feeling guilty for the oral problems in their children; 26.3% of the children presented with caries, 39.8% malocclusion, 22.9% TDI. Of the parents who felt guilty, 54% thought that their children had problems in their teeth, and most of them (82%) thought that the problem could have been avoided. The feeling of guilt in parents was significantly associated with ECC and the psychological variables: the thought that the child had problems in his/her teeth and the thought that the problem could have been avoided. CONCLUSION Parents feel more guilty with increased caries severity in their children, and the likelihood of feeling guilty increases when parents believe that their child has an oral problem or that this problem could have been avoided.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > School of Dental Medicine, Restorative Dentistry, Research

UniBE Contributor:

Carvalho, Thiago Saads

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1365-263X

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thiago Saads Carvalho

Date Deposited:

14 Dec 2018 10:18

Last Modified:

14 Dec 2018 10:18

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/ipd.12306

PubMed ID:

28514517

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.121800

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/121800

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